Projects:

Borderlands

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Between lowland and mountain; beside Offa’s Dyke; in the Welsh Marches; astride a line drawn in the C16th. There are many ways to indicate where the rural borderlands between England and Wales lie, including colourful anomalies like the The Lion in Llanymynech: until it closed, the pub sat astride the border and had one bar in Wales and two in England, so drinkers could avoid dry Sundays in Montgomeryshire by sitting in Shropshire.

...neither wholly the independence of the Welsh hill-farm, nor the more collective mindset of the English town. It is instead a type of ‘apartness’It is much harder, though, to characterise the nature of life in these areas, where the cultures of both countries have long mixed with fluidity, albeit at times with a turbulent fluidity. The result – hereabouts, anyway – is an outlook that is neither wholly the independence of the Welsh hill-farm, nor the more collective mindset of the English town. It is instead a type of ‘apartness’, a bartering self-reliance that’s easily overlooked because it doesn’t trouble to make itself heard over the everyday static that washes in from outside. You can hear it, though, if snow drifts close the roads for a spell: it was in the sounds of the countryside still at work, and in the self-containment of the villages, their clustered lights surrounded by the snow and darkness.

These images are among the first in a long-term project in which I'm trying to reflect life in the borderlands.

© David Roberts 2019